Shrewsbury Towne-Monmouth Chapter, NSDAR

Programs and Events

Guests are welcome to attend our monthly chapter meetings. Please contact our chapter regent, Kathleen J. Evans, for information.

2018-2019 Program Calendar:

2018

September 2018

September 17-23,
Constitution Week
 

October 2018
Family History Month 


Monday, October 1, 2018
7:00 p.m.
New Member Initiation

Program: A few things you DON’T KNOW about DAR

November 2018
Native American History Month

Monday, November, 5, 2018
7:00 p.m
.
Program: Are You Getting a Good Night’s Sleep?
Presenter: Kathleen Feeney, Certified Clinical Sleep Educator - Hackensack Meridian Corp. Neuroscience

December 2018

Saturday, December 1, 2018 at 1:00 p.m.
Program: The Future of the Past at Jersey Shore: Preservation in Ocean Grove
Presenter: Dr. Jenny Shaffer, NYU Adjunct Assoc. Professor of Art History

2019

February 2019
American History Month

Saturday, Febuary 9, 2019
1:00 p.m.
Old First Church
Program: Historian Elaine Lent profiles William Alexander, Lord Stirling

March 2019
Women's History Month

Monday, March 11, 2019
7:00 p.m.
Program: TBD

April 2019

Monday, April 8, 2019
7:00 p.m.
Program: Essay Awards Night
Presenter: Kathleen Mazzacco

May 2019

Saturday, May 11, 2019
12:00 p.m.
Program: It’s a PICNIC!


 

Commemorative Events

Independence Day
DAR chapters are encouraged to celebrate the adoption of the Declaration of Independence on July 4, 1776, by organizing and participating in proclamations, flag flyings, parades, wreath layings, grave markings and fireworks events in their local communities.

Daughters and guests in the national capital region are invited to join the NSDAR in the National Independence Day Parade. Since 2001, DAR has participated in this patriotic commemoration that is co-hosted by the National Park Service.

Suggested websites:

National Independence Day Parade
U.S. National Park Service: Independence Day at the National Mall
Independence Day on USA.gov: History, Fireworks Information and Safety Tips


100th Anniversary of Women’s Suffrage

Immediately after the Civil War, Susan B. Anthony, a strong and outspoken advocate of women's rights, demanded that the Fourteenth Amendment include a guarantee of the vote for women as well as for African-American males. In 1869, Anthony and Elizabeth Cady Stanton founded the National Woman Suffrage Association. Later that year, Lucy Stone, Julia Ward Howe, and others formed the American Woman Suffrage Association. However, not until the passage of the Nineteenth Amendment in 1919 did women throughout the nation gain the right to vote.

50th Anniversary of the Vietnam War
NSDAR has partnered with the The United States of America Vietnam War 50th Anniversary Commemoration, established by Congress, to "thank and honor veterans of the Vietnam War, including personnel who were held as prisoners of war (POW) or listed as missing in action (MIA), for their service and sacrifice on behalf of the United States and to thank and honor the families of these veterans."


US Commemoration website with suggestions for programs and events: http://www.vietnamwar50th.com
Contact your local Veterans Administration for information on the Stand Down program for homeless veterans.
Suggested Website: http://www.va.gov/HOMELESS/StandDown.asp

Suggested websites:

www.thewall-usa.com
www.nps.gov/vive


75th Anniversary of the Attack on Pearl Harbor
Just before 8 a.m. on December 7, 1941, hundreds of Japanese fighter planes attacked the American naval base at Pearl Harbor near Honolulu, Hawaii. The barrage lasted just two hours, but it was devastating: The Japanese managed to destroy nearly 20 American naval vessels, including eight enormous battleships, and almost 200 airplanes. More than 2,000 Americans soldiers and sailors died in the attack, and another 1,000 were wounded. The day after the assault, President Franklin D. Roosevelt asked Congress to declare war on Japan; Congress approved his declaration with just one dissenting vote. Three days later, Japanese allies Germany and Italy also declared war on the United States, and again Congress reciprocated. More than two years into the conflict, America had finally joined World War II. Information is being updated regularly on the official website. Check it out here. Click on 'Events' and December 7th, 2016 for additional information.

150th Anniversary of Memorial Day
In 1966, Congress and President Lyndon Johnson declared Waterloo, N.Y., the “birthplace” of Memorial Day. There, a ceremony on May 5, 1866, honored local veterans who had fought in the Civil War. Businesses closed and residents flew flags at half-staff. Supporters of Waterloo’s claim say earlier observances in other places were informal, not community-wide, or one-time events. By the end of the 19th century, Memorial Day ceremonies were being held on May 30 throughout the nation. State legislatures passed proclamations designating the day, and the Army and Navy adopted regulations for proper observance at their facilities. It was not until after World War I, however, that the day was expanded to honor those who have died in all American wars. In 1971, Memorial Day was declared a national holiday by an act of Congress and was then designated to be celebrated each year on the last Monday in May.

 

100th Anniversary of American’s Creed
The American’s Creed was a result of a nationwide contest for writing a National Creed, which would be a brief summary of the American political faith founded upon things fundamental in American history and tradition. The contest was the idea of Henry Sterling Chapin, Commissioner of Education of New York State. Over three thousand entries were received, and William Tyler Page was declared to be the winner. James H. Preston, the mayor of Baltimore, presented an award to Page in the House of Representatives Office Building on April 3, 1918. The Speaker of the House of Representatives and the commissioner of education of the state of New York accepted the Creed for the United States, and the proceedings relating to the award were printed in the Congressional Record of April 13, 1918. It was a time when patriotic sentiments were very much in vogue. The United States had been a participant in World War I only a little over a year at the time the Creed was adopted. The author of the American’s Creed, William Tyler Page, was a descendant of John Page, who had come to America in1650 and had settled in Williamsburg, Virginia. For twenty-two consecutive years, he led the assembled Continental Congresses of the Daughters of the American Revolution in reciting the Creed.

75th Anniversary of D-Day
On June 6, 1944, more than 160,000 allied troops landed along a 50-mile stretch of heavily-fortified French coastline. It was on the beaches of Normandy, France, that more than 9,000 allied soldiers were killed or wounded in the fight against Nazi Germany. Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower termed the operation a crusade in which, "we will accept nothing less than full victory." More than 5,000 ships and 13,000 aircraft supported the D-Day invasion, and by day's end, the allies gained a foothold in continental Europe. The cost in lives on D-Day was high but their sacrifice allowed more than 100,000 soldiers to begin the slow, hard trudge across Europe to defeat Adolph Hitler. The airborne assault into Normandy, as part of the D-Day allied invasion of Europe, was the largest use of airborne troops up to that time. Paratroopers of the U.S. 82nd and 101st Airborne Divisions, the British 6th Airborne Division, the 1st Canadian Parachute Battalion, and other attached Allied units took part in the assault. Numbering more than 13,000 men, the paratroopers were flown from bases in southern England to the Cotentin Peninsula in approximately 925 C-47 airplanes. An additional 4,000 men, consisting of glider infantry with supporting weapons, medical, and signal units were to arrive in 500 gliders later on D-Day to reinforce the paratroopers. The parachute troops were assigned what was probably the most difficult task of the initial operation - a night jump behind enemy lines five hours before the coastal landings.

 

 


DAR American History Essay Contest
All students in grades 5 - 8, in a public, private or parochial school, or who are home-schooled, are eligible

Please contact our chapter webmaster, for information.

Scholarships

The NSDAR awards multiple scholarships to students showing dedication to the pursuit of degrees in diverse disciplines including history, law, nursing, and education.

The DAR Scholarship Committee awards scholarships to qualified applicants regardless of race, religion, sex or national origin. All multi-year scholarships, typically renewable up to four years, must be for consecutive years of attendance at an accredited college or university in the United States. The only exception is the American Indian Scholarship that is available for students pursuing vocational training.

Scholarships

 

DAR Schools

DAR Supported Schools

Since 1903, the Society has been helping children in remote mountain areas receive an education. The DAR supports two schools in the Appalachian region- Kate Duncan Smith DAR School, Alabama, and Tamassee DAR School, South Carolina.

Kate Duncan Smith (KDS), founded on Gunter Mountain by the Alabama DAR in 1924, is a day school, kindergarten through 12th grade, serving an area of 100 square miles. Enrollment averages 1,300 students yearly. Special emphasis is placed on responsible citizenship, academic achievement, and horticultural and computer skills. Preparation for college and vocational training are important parts of the curriculum.

Tamasse DAR School is a private 501-(c)(3) non-profit children’s home and family service organization offering multi-faceted programs to serve children and families with a variety of needs.  Our programs and services include seven child care homes that serve up to 8 – 10 residential children, a Middle School Academy program,  an After Care Program for reunified families and students enrolled in college or living independently, and a  Day Care Program serving infants, toddlers and after school children in the community.  Tamassee DAR School was founded by the South Carolina State Society DAR and accepted as a National Project by the National Society DAR in 1921. Since that time, thousands of children have received a loving home, an excellent education and the love of a professional caring staff. 

The following schools are on the Approved Schools list:

Berry College, Georgia, was founded in 1902 to provide high school education to rural youth and became the first approved DAR school in 1904. It was developed into a college in 1926, and today, it is one of the outstanding comprehensive colleges in the South, with fully accredited art, science and professional programs as well as specialized graduate programs in education and business administration.

Crossnore School, Inc., North Carolina, was founded in the early 1900s to give the children from the mountains and foothills of North Carolina a home while attending public schools in Avery County. The school also provides day care services for local children.

Hillside School, Inc., Massachusetts, was founded in 1901 as a rural home for boys who were orphaned or otherwise without a home or family. It now provides a structural and supportive environment for students with learning problems. Its program stresses reading, writing, math, science, literature, social studies, fine arts, and industrial arts.

Hindman Settlement School, Kentucky, was founded in 1902 to provide an educational opportunity for the youth of the mountains. Its major educational emphasis today is its work with students with dyslexic characteristics. This is the only program of its type within 200 miles.It also offers an Adult Basic Education/GED Program.

Each of these schools is given financial assistance by DAR members, including scholarships, material donations, and genuine personal interest. Over $1 million is given annually by the DAR to support these schools.

Help support these schools through the
Friends of DAR Schools Fund

The DAR, through its American Indians Committee, assists in the education of Indian youth through scholarships and support of Bacone College, Muskogee, Oklahoma, the oldest continuing institution of higher learning in Oklahoma, and Chemawa Indian School in Salem, Oregon.

Good citizenship and love of country are taught at all of these schools.


 

 

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